Open A Shift in Political Opinion

Baudin Toolan

Grepolis Team
With the success of presidential candidates Trump and Sanders do you believe we are seeing a major shift in political opinion for both of the main government parties? Both Trump and Sanders hold views and are pushing political agendas that are outside of what is considered normal for their respective parties. They have both had a great deal of success with their campaigns with Trump having the greater success. Is their success indicative of a change in the political climate in America?
Are there scenarios in other countries that are similar to this change in political views? If so do you believe it is also an indication that what people want has changed over the past few years?

Please try to keep your responses civil and within the rules as this is a subject that could spiral out of control quite quickly but I'm willing ti give it a chance.
 

figtree2

Polemarch
I do agree that people are fed up with politicians. The problems that need to be fixed are the debt, the economy, and terrorism/crime. Nothing ever gets accomplished because the politicians won't agree on anything. They always argue and try to add unnecessary items to bills. I hope whoever gets elected can straighten this out.
 
Congress created its own monster here. They spent the last eight years doing about as much in congress as Inno does to make a new end game. Seriously they're the least productive congress in history and have the approval rating of the second Bush administration. Their contempt for each other spread to their followers who began listening less to opposing views and understanding and more on what they'll say next. This has especially been an issue with liberalism in my generation which actually believes in the use of safe spaces to protect them from outside views and labels everything they don't like as hate speech. By the way, if you slightly disagree with some of these people, it's an insult to their way of life. Conservatives aren't much better making mountains out of mole hills such as bathrooms and transgender people using them. Fun fact, your kid is more likely to get touched inappropriately by a Subway spokes person than a transgender person in a bathroom. so now we have a problem, we have a bunch of incompetent politicians running congress who point the finger at each other. This worked for about eight years but now it's become God knows what where Clinton, a person with so many skeletons in her closet that Hannibal Lecter is taking notes. Trump, the guy who's probably going to win because he's open about the skeletons he keeps in his closet. I mean they're nice, much nicer than Clintons, she doesn't keep them clean either. Trump keeps the cleanest skeletons. And if you're not getting what that was about, please let me know so I know not to bother discussing the election with you as you haven't been watching enough to have anything more than an opinion. Anyways onto every college safe space advocate's pick, Bernie Sanders. Now I live in Michigan where the name Sanders is affiliated with everything great in the 90's here. The guy is pretty genuine and he probably got screwed. That said you try telling a Sanders supporter that Sanders doesn't have the right idea on everything. Just do it and sit back, the uninformed rants will begin followed by tumblr zingers to counter facts. Did I mention the #2 guy in the GOP was Ted Cruz? Quick go type in "Ted Cruz, real human for president" into google. That's about all you need to know. The guy is scary and his voting record and speeches back it up.

So yeah, you combine all of what I got to bear witness to in the past 365 days here at my college and I'd say there's been a major shift in political opinions since the last election. I'm writing myself in and not as a joke I genuinely think I can do a better job at this point.
 

pagodaswan

Phrourach
Politicians are two faced, regardless as to where they are in the world...they tell you what they know you want to hear so that you will vote for them and as soon as they get into that prized position of power they backtrack on everything using a variety of excuses

In the US its time for a new President...over here in the UK its time to vote out of the EU

Trump is using current tragedies to score points...and he is not alone in that, politicians have done so since time in memoriam

Bottom line, to me at least, it really makes no difference who gets the vote anymore cos the only sure thing will be that the promises made before the vote rarely if ever make it past that vote

And as a result we are still stuck at square one, in limbo in a world full of apologists, terrorists, floaters and finger pointers

C'est la vie :rolleyes:
 

Tangy Tom

Guest
It's just a backlash against career politicians who tow the party line over well held beliefs,how better the world was when people stood up for whatever they believed regardless of ridicule or outrage of the press. It doesn't matter about the US election though as you all carry too much debt to ever really change from your current course.
 

Joseph Nieves

Phrourach
I'm writing myself in and not as a joke I genuinely think I can do a better job at this point.
TSF for President! Seriously though, wish I could rep that post. It's kind of a shame that even with the shift in political opinion, a person like Hillary still has a good chance of winning because she is seen as the lesser of the two evils.
 

Skullyhoofd

Guest
As a non-American, it's simply been a lot of fun to see this election cycle. :D Actually rooting for trump now, so the country will have voted for their own demise à la Brittain
 

Rhizome9

Hipparchus
Perhaps this question is the wrong way round. Rather than focusing on Trump or Sanders, should the question be about why so many people feel that the answer is with Trump or Sanders?

The right wing populism of Trump is echoed in the UK by the rise of UKIP. In the North of the country, many traditional Labour voters appear to have switched to UKIP as they perceive Labour as having continually and consistently let them down. There remains widespread low pay and comparitively lower levels of employment or investment in the North (London has 24 times more investment per head of population than does the NorthEast). For them, immigration was clearly an issue in the referrendum, as it was for some right-wing conservatives across the South of England. The linking of immigration to crime may well also have been a factor. There was also rhetoric around Britains place in the world, and a response to alleged decline.

Whilst I'm not American, and from what I understand of the situation over there, some of the same issues apply. There is a sense that American prestige and position in the world is in decline. Likewise, many Americans see some industries and businesses in decline or taken over by foreign investors, which in turn affects jobs and neighbourhoods. Immigration is seen by some as being linked to fewer jobs and lower wages, and sometimes linked to crime.

It feels like in an increasingly globalised world where there is far greater uncertainty for people, there is an obvious appeal from the politics of Trump or of UKIP (or of Brexit). Sadly, neither is going to be the answer for the majority of hard working Americans or Britons.
 

Zero Point

Phrourach
Politics is a game, manipulated by the powerful to deceive the masses into thinking they actually have a say.

globally the political so called democratic systems are overdue massive reforms. I understand the swiss have a system that maintains a very high response in all votes and that it is far more determined by the will of the masses. they are also one of the wealthiest countries in the world, is this coincidence?

I think the move towards extremes like ukip and trump is a direct result of populations desperation to see political reform. when the norm constantly fails, when change is not offered, then these extreme choices manifest as the only hope for change.
 

Rhizome9

Hipparchus
Politics is a game, manipulated by the powerful to deceive the masses into thinking they actually have a say.
I completely agree.

And I would also add that people like Trump or Farage (former UKIP leader) are part of the establishment, and will do nothing to change the political system that is manipulated by the powerful!!!
 

figtree2

Polemarch
I completely agree.

And I would also add that people like Trump or Farage (former UKIP leader) are part of the establishment, and will do nothing to change the political system that is manipulated by the powerful!!!
Most politicians won't change anything. They are just there to line their pockets. The Democratic party has had the White House for 8 years and they are still complaining about the same problems that were going on when Obama took office. Real change is needed and it is needed now.
 

Rhizome9

Hipparchus
Just re-visiting this thread after a period of time, and it was an important discussion (thanks to Baudin for posting it).

It was evident that people wanted something different: they wanted something to change. Trump did look like the person who would make change happen, and (to an extent) Brexit looked like it would also make change happen. Unfortunately, both have turned into false prophets - both are clearly not the answer that is being sought. People remain just as disillusioned and in need of a real change for the better.
 

dadofwildthang

Phrourach
I feel the largest problem is voter ignorance coupled with population segment attraction, fueled by data analytics. Facebook info was manipulated (into Fake news) , by both the NRC and the Russians, resulting in #45 being elected.
The theory of ruling by Chaos is not proving effective by #45
. note the last raid on his lawyer

#45 will be impeached shortly after the BLUE wave hits the house in November.

This will be the first election where US youth will vote in numbers never seen before, for their age group. The Florida school shootings saw to that, The youth mobilization that has followed will change the face of the American politician
to that which listens to their constituents.

My biggest question is: What will be left of the institutions by then?